Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Less Stress Summer Guide

Less Stress Summer Guide



After a winter of endless snow and subzero temperatures for most of the country, many are eagerly awaiting summer. Consequently, the recent nice weather in Chicago has stirred anticipation for summer festivals, dining al fresco and afternoons at the beach. For someone in recovery though the summer months may also trigger anxiety around body image, and concerns about maintaining recovery while enjoying summer's fun. Just as we prepare for the stresses of the winter holiday season we can examine our recovery toolboxes and plan for the summer ahead.

1. Summer Clothing

Many of us spend winter reveling in the fact that we can use clothes to cover up what we would rather not reveal to others. As the temperatures rise the safety of our cotton layers become uncomfortable, leaving us with what seems like no protection. Add in the pressures of what the media tells us a summer wardrobe is supposed to be like and dressing ourselves feels like a losing battle. But it doesn't have to be. Every morning you have the option to choose: Skirt or pants? Short sleeves or long? Fortunately in 2014 there are many options that can be comfortable both for the temperature and for you. Look through your closet and have a few options that you know you usually feel good in. Know which pieces are more challenging for you and on the days you wear them acknowledge your bravery. And remember, clothes can be fun but they don't speak to your kindness, courage or strength. Listen to what's right for you that day and honor it.

2. The Beach

Whether you're at the beach or not it seems like so much centers around it during the summer. Every gym is certain they can help you achieve a beach body, and dieting products will assert the same. The funny thing is, every time I'm at the beach I see every body there. Every body can go to the beach to enjoy the sun against her skin or sand beneath her toes. What is being advertised to us as a “beach body” has nothing to do with the beach; instead it's just another marketing ploy. Consequently, the bodies advertised to us are photoshopped and the models featured are paid to look a certain way. Reminding ourselves of these things can help us challenge these ads.

Beyond the ads, if you enjoy going to the beach make an effort to focus on the things that drew you there. Dip your toes in the water, run your hands through the sand and laugh with the people you're with. Resist the urge to compare yourself to the person across the way, acknowledging that they are okay the way they are and you are okay the way you are. Being present for the moment can help take your mind off of how you and everyone else looks.

For those that do not enjoy the beach a genuine, kind “no-thanks” is all you need. If you're feeling left out, consider many of the other activities you could invite others to. Fortunately in Chicago there are plenty of opportunities for movies in the park, impromptu trips to the zoo and music in Millennium Park. Create an achievable list of activities you want to do this summer so that when you turn down an invite to the beach you have others options to enjoy the summer months.

3. Vacations and Irregular Schedules

Maybe you're going on vacation this summer or your therapist is. With summer may come a few weeks in your treatment that you or your therapist have to miss an appointment. If you are anticipating a break in your treatment for a week or two, talk to your therapist. Together you can plan for the time away so that you don't feel like you're sitting in a canoe without a paddle. Often we forget about our most obvious tools when we're stressed. In hindsight we remember that we could have used breathing to slow us down or our senses to help ground us in the present. Work with your therapist down to sharpen your tools so that when the moment arises you can more quickly access them. With this, consider activities you can turn to while on vacation that can help you release the thoughts you'd normally share with your therapist. Write down what you may have shared with your therapist or take some time at the end of the day to acknowledge a few of your strengths. This can help keep your mind in recovery mode rather than on vacation of its own.

Summers seems to require a larger degree of flexibility sometimes, which can be difficult when in you're in the thick of treatment. Be gentle with yourself during this time. Speak up about concerns you may have so that your support system can help. Prepare for what you can during the summer and recognize your effort if something does not go as planned. Just because the temperatures are rising doesn't mean your anxiety has to heat up as well.

Katie Infusino

Katie is an intern at The Awakening Center and finishing up her Masters degree in Community Counseling at DePaul University. She has been thrilled to be an intern at The Awakening Center this year and plans to continue specializing in the treatment of eating disorders and trauma.

1 comment:

  1. Amy Grabowski, Director The Awakening CenterApril 30, 2014 at 10:23 AM

    Thanks Katie! Great Suggestions!
    PS - We've been thrilled that you were an intern at TAC too!

    ReplyDelete